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Black History Month Programs highlight past and present issues

Black History Month Programs highlight past and present issues

Hip-hop activist David Banner co-leads Planet Deep South Colloquium

David Banner (Photo by Anissa Hidouk/JSU)

David Banner (Photo by Anissa Hidouk/JSU)

Rapper, producer, actor and activist David Banner was one of the leaders of a panel discussion at a town hall-style forum at JSU during the 2016 “Planet Deep South Colloquium: Speculative Cultural Production and Africanisms in the American Black South.”

In conjunction with Astro Blackness, the Feb. 25 event in the Dollye M.E. Robinson Liberal Arts Building was sponsored by the Fannie Lou Hamer Institute @ COFO and the Institute for Social Justice and Race.

The three-day interdisciplinary colloquium was open to all scholars, artists and others who wanted to explore the intellectual and creative expression of African people. Discussions probed southern Black cultural production through a historical and speculative lens.

African-American Read-In encourages young readers, promotes authors

scarborough-1-208x300The Department of English kicked off Black History Month with its 27th Annual African-American Read-In on Feb.1 in the Dollye M.E. Robinson Liberal Arts Building. 

The Read-In, held in conjunction with the National Council of Teachers of English, had a two-fold purpose: to encourage young African-Americans to read and to promote African-American authors. This year’s selected text was “The Autobiography of William Sanders Scarborough: An American Journey from Slavery to Scholarship.”

Scarborough was the first professional classicist of African descent, and his work paved the way for many younger scholars of color. In 1881, he made history by publishing a Greek textbook with A.S. Barnes in New York City, proving to the world that Black people also had the ability to master classical languages.

JSU publishes booklet of ‘Milestones in Democracy’ essays by JPS students

JSU’s Dr. Otha Burton and Dr. Evelyn J. Leggette present ‘Milestones in Democracy’ book of essays to JPS Superintendent Dr. Cedric Gray. (Photo by Charles A. Smith/JSU)

JSU’s Dr. Otha Burton and Dr. Evelyn J. Leggette present ‘Milestones in Democracy’ book of essays to JPS Superintendent Dr. Cedric Gray.
(Photo by Charles A. Smith/JSU)

In celebration of Black History Month and the strong partnership with Jackson Public Schools and the City of Jackson, Jackson State University presented 1,700 copies of a special publication “Reflections From Our Students” to JPS superintendent Cedric Gray, members of the Board of Trustees and a standing-room only audience.

“We are so delighted to join with Jackson Public Schools in this and other partnerships, and we know if our public schools are strong in preparing our students for the next level of their education then our colleges and universities are stronger as we prepare students for a more diverse and global citizenry,” said Dr. Evelyn J. Leggette, JSU provost and senior vice president for Academic and Student Affairs. She and Dr. Otha Burton, executive director of the JSU Institute of Government (IOG), presented the booklets at the JPS school board meeting Feb. 16. All JPS high school seniors will receive a copy of the booklet, which showcases their writing, analytical, critical-thinking and research skills.

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